How to cope with hesitant people on Facebook [Bicycle bubble]
Tags
Mobility 🚲
Psychology 🧠
Published Date
Description
It has become somewhat common in the near past for me to spend hours at a time expressing my point of view on traffic policy in rambling discussions. Whether on Twitter or Facebook - the algorithms managed to lead me down the rabbit holes to yet more and more relevant and controversial topics.

Do I want to be rabbit-holed?

On the one hand, I have to say that public awareness on the topic is already important to me, especially since some myths in the field such as Induced demand have long been dispelled.
On the other hand, it quickly felt to me like running from pub to pub, making the same arguments over and over again, and yet receiving similar headwinds again. I therefore tried more and more to distance myself from the poles and take a differentiated, qualified and ultimately shattering opinion, which is accepted by all sides but still steers in a certain direction.
But somehow it became annoying to find myself again and again in debates with similar people (mid-60s boomers who hide behind dog photos and because of where they live it is actually questionable what their role is in a discussion among residents of a liveable city.
 

What transport policy is about for me

All in all, I'm really only interested in bringing Dutch traffic infrastructure onto German & other European roads. Why is that so great? Well, you can be a car driver, cyclist or pedestrian here without having to accept any disadvantages, such as a loss of safety.
 
I couldn't imagine living in a car-dependent and isolated suburb where I would commute to work every day and shuttle my kids to field hockey practice. But people do and I think it would be fatal to forget these people in the design decisions of future cities.
 
 
83% of all neighborhoods in the Netherlands have a Supermarket and🟢/🟡or a Pharmacy within fifteen minutes cycling distance. The Netherlands is a 15-minute city. @BertVanRest pic.twitter.com/eKJRqMJz6f — Eugène Franken (@EugeneFranken) September 26, 2020
 

So how might we mass-educate them?

  • Pick up common misconceptions (e.g. cyclists never follow the rules)
  • Empathise Explain why they might perceive it like that
  • Educate: Give a quick source to get
 
Randomize common misconceptions
 
 

Prototype

 
 
 
Copy of Fahrrad FFM